Visit SpaceCampUtah.org to learn more about the Space Education Centers in Utah. Visit SpaceGuard.org and ProjectVoyager.org for information on joining a simulator based school space and science club.

Monday, June 1, 2015

The USS Voyager's Sheetrock Bulkhead Walls are Installed. The Imaginarium.

The USS Voyager's Sheetrock Bulkhead Walls are Installed
Phaser and Blaster proof.  Air tight?  Ah, that's another question.


Our digital walk through the new USS Voyager, flagship of the fleet, begins as always in the ship's Briefing Room - complete with three paneled main viewer showing computer generated images from Earth to ward off homesickness for those long space voyages without mom.




I'm standing in the Briefing Room looking toward (left) The Room of Requirement - the multipurpose 'transport' room (mostly to be used as a transporter or turbo-lift).  On the right is the double door entrance to the Work-Bee and STEMLAB.  Beyond is the Control Room.


Standing in the Work Bee area looking back toward the Briefing Room.  Another entrance to the Room of Requirement is on the right.


The Control Room has plenty of electricity - no doubt about that.  This is one lesson we had to learn the hard way when building the simulators at the Space Center.


The power source of the USS Voyager.  It all ebbs and flows from here.


Walking toward the Voyager's Bridge through the Room of Requirement.  The Control Room is on the right.  The two windows looking into the Bridge are not windows at all.  They are openings prepared for our Engineering Department's dial and switch magic boxes.  Let's hear it for Matt Long and the Voyager Club's Engineering Department!


Standing near those engineering boxes and looking back toward the Briefing Room.  


And turn and march down this short hallway compete with three engineering panel boxes and something mysterious at floor level.  Could that be a hatchway?  If so, where does it lead and for what purpose was it installed?  The USS Voyager, a ship of wonders and marvels.  


Up the ramped hallway and onto the bridge.  The lower part of the bridge has become a problem for us.  At first, the desk surrounding the horseshoe were too high so a prototype was constructed. I sat on a blue student chair and held that computer monitor at that Goldilocks position where it was just right - not too high as to obstruct the computer operator's view of the command officers, and not too low where the crewman had no leg room.   



I'm thinking we got it right.  This prototype desk now becomes the starting point for Alex DeBirk - Imagineer Extraordinaire.   Just watch as he takes this simple plywood desk and designs something so marvelous it will take the breath away from people walking onto the Voyager's Bridge for the first time.   


The ceiling cloud over the back section of the Bridge.  


We leave the bridge out this exit, walk down another ramp, and turn left.


The Brig / Sick Bay Quarantine Compartment are found on our immediate left.  Continue down and around the hall to Engineering and the Sick Bay proper.



On the left wall are the entrances to Sick Bay and Engineering.  On the right - storage compartments and another of those mystery hatches to be sure.  

This brings you up to date on the USS Voyager's construction as of Saturday.  More to follow this week.

I'm hoping you all have a wonderful start to your summer vacation.

Mr. W.

The Imaginarium








































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